Multiple Teams · Champions Get Coached – Travis D.


December 14, 2018
Champions Get Coached
If you’re a typical sports parent, your child’s experience getting coached can be complicated. It’s usually complicated because it requires handing over some control of the experience to someone else – someone you may or may not fully trust. Besides, getting coached can feel negative, critical, or judgmental for your child, or even for you. Many players and parents feel defensive or victimized by the honesty of authentic coaching. But getting coached, I want you to see today, is a critical part of your kid’s development and a necessary part of becoming a champion. If your child’s gonna learn to do it right, he’ll need your help.
Why does a champion get coached? Because a champion is relentlessly driven by the process of improvement. He has the humility to accept that information from others – including his coach – is a valuable resource he can use to get better. As opposed to the proud, egotistical, “know-it-all” attitude of many athletes, the champion is hungry for help in his pursuit of greatness. You might call him a “learn-it-all.” That’s really what he’s after, and he trusts that his coach can help. He doesn’t feel defensive or victimized by his coach’s honesty, even if it does seem critical. He craves information that can help him improve. That’s why a champion gets coached.
So how will your child learn the value of this often overlooked talent? If it’s going to happen, it’ll probably happen through the teaching and training you provide as his champion parent. If you’re a champion, you’ve probably adopted a “learn-it-all” attitude yourself. You see “getting coached” differently than others, and your perspective has clarified for you what many parents can easily complicate:
*You see that every event or experience – even the one involving a coach that could be perceived as challenging or difficult – is an opportunity to help your child get better. You’re relentlessly driven by the process of his or her improvement.
*As a champion sports parent, you see that getting coached is actually a lot less about the coach and a lot more about your child. You know you may not always agree with how the coach decides to instruct or communicate, but that won’t diminish the expectation you have for how your child handles it.
*You see that getting coached is a talent that can separate your child from others he’ll be competing with and against his entire athletic career. As your kid comes to an understanding of how coaching can help him improve, and as he develops an internal desire to receive it, he gets closer to reaching his full potential, and closer to becoming a champion himself.
As a champion sports parent, you see that getting coached is actually a lot less about
the coach and a lot more about your child.
I want to challenge you today to intentionally cultivate in your child the ability to get coached. That means not only helping him develop that internal desire to improve, but also holding him accountable for the external responses of a champion – like his eye contact when coach is talking, his confirmation of coach’s instruction like a head nod or a “yes, sir,” and his determination to keep on striving, no matter the message or how it’s delivered. Of course, he’ll never come to a clear understanding in this area if you don’t help him, but you can’t help him come to an understanding if you haven’t come to it yourself.
First and foremost, become relentlessly driven by the process of your young athlete’s improvement. You don’t have to see coaching as criticism or judgment by some person you may not fully trust. Instead, see it as information you can use in pursuit of your child’s growth. See that every event or experience – even what’s challenging or difficult – can help him get better. See that getting coached is actually a lot less about the coach and a lot more about your child. And see that by developing this ability in your champion athlete, you’re separating him from the crowd, and helping him become his very best.
-Travis